A Reader's Questions Answered

Wednesday, January 13, 2010




I received an email from a lovely reader and would like to answer her questions right here because they may apply to many others.

Here are Erin's questions:

I have 2 questions for you that I was hoping you could help me with:

1. Do you have any recipes or product suggestions for babies with eczema? My poor little guy has some breakouts on his head and face and I hate to use anything harsh on his skin.

2. Do you know of any body creams that are as fabulous as yours? Sad to hear that you are no longer selling, but I wish you the best on your new creations!


Let's address your first question, Erin:

I have more experience with eczema than I would like. I know it can wreak havoc on your little one's skin and be tr When Nicholas was a baby, he had allergies to egg whites and cow's milk. We did not have a firm diagnosis until he was just under a year old. He had severe eczema on his legs, back, and smaller spots on his arms. Not knowing he had a cow's milk allergy, I kept using the Burt's Bees Baby Bee line on him. I slathered that stuff on him--especially the products containing buttermilk. I used the Buttermilk Bath, Buttermilk Soap, and Baby Bee Buttermilk Lotion. I used the whole line on him. This made his problem so much worse. I thought I was helping his skin and I made it worse.

Once we found out that he was allergic to cow's milk, I immediately knew I would have to be super careful about what I would be able to put on his skin. Our pediatrician recommended treating his condition with Cetaphil Cleanser and Aquaphor. I did for a while. His issues worsened with the Cetaphil. I would advise against anyone using either product because of their ingredients. You can read more about what is in Cetaphil and Aquaphor here.

Nicholas outgrew his allergies by his 4th birthday, thankfully. I still treat his skin the way I did when he had severe eczema from his allergies, and I'll share with you what we use.



I used to make lotions for fun back in the late 1990s. I started trying different recipes again, only this time using goat's milk. I highly recommend Meyenberg goat's milk--the real stuff, not the powder. You can find lowfat, but for skin care, get the whole milk. It can be used in lotions and soaps or in the tub as a simple milk bath. I would advise pouring a cup into his bath.

I had read about the anecdotal evidence suggesting goat's milk can successfully treat eczema. Topically, it worked well for my son. I have also seen many articles about drinking goat's milk to treat eczema. You may find that helpful, too.

Goat's milk lotion and cream worked wonders on my own son. The enzymes in the goat's milk are what are supposed to be so beneficial. Nick also needed a safe and gentle cleanser, though. I became really concerned about knowing exactly what was in each product he used. I wanted to see it in front of my eyes to make sure there was no cross-contamination. I had only made melt and pour soap until then and decided to try making cold process soap for our family. It took several recipes and I finally made a bar I liked after many dud batches. The internet and books have so many great recipes to try if you'd like to learn to make soap.

Goat's Milk is something I would highly recommend for eczema, especially in the bath. I could use this on my Nick because it doesn't contain the whey proteins found in cow's milk. I would recommend a goat's milk soap for your son's skin at bath time. My favorite for kids is Aunt Nancy's Handmade Soap fragrance free bar with Goat's Milk, Oatmeal, and Honey. This is what I use on my own children every single day. It's $5.50 and can be found right on Etsy.






If you prefer a liquid cleanser, I can recommend Dr. Bronner's Shikakai Baby Unscented 3 in 1. It can be used as a gentle shampoo and body wash. We also use it as a hand soap.





Twice a week, I like to make a mask for eczema. My son's eczema has been about 90% cleared up for a few years now, but this mask helps the tricky areas. Mix equal parts honey (I like buckwheat) to Olive Leaf Powder. Add in a couple drops of olive oil or distilled water. The Herberie has a certified organic olive leaf powder for around $4. The polyphenols in the olive leaf are great for many skin conditions including eczema.

Keeping skin with eczema hydrated is crucial. Honestly, I use olive oil on the boys' skin right after bath and follow with pure shea butter. There are no fragrances in it and the fewer the ingredients the better when it comes to eczema. I like the shea from Mountain Rose Herbs. Any extra virgin olive oil will be suitable for your son's skin. I just get the Wegmans brand here at home.






If you prefer to purchase a lotion from the store, California Baby Super Sensitive Everyday Lotion is quite nice.


2. Do you know of any body creams that are as fabulous as yours? Sad to hear that you are no longer selling, but I wish you the best on your new creations!


I'll tackle Erin's second question now:



For a body cream to use when the one you have now is gone, I recommend pure virgin coconut oil or shea butter. If you would like a cream you can find right in Target or Walmart, I highly recommend Alba Kukui Body Butter. It is super rich and I use it often when I need a good cream. Another recommendation is Queen Helene Naturals Fair Trade Certified Cocoa Butter Creme. The texture is divine.


Thank you, Erin, for sending in your questions. Remember, I love getting questions and comments and will happily answer them for any of you.

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